Background of The Gospel of Matthew


Matthew’s Gospel was written to a Jewish audience with the purpose of presenting Jesus as the Messiah prophesied by the Old Testament. It was likely composed sometime between 60 and 70 AD, although some date it even earlier, and believe it to be the first gospel written. Although it has similarities to the other gospels, it is a unique portrait of Jesus and his ministry. Matthew is the only gospel to record the  the Sermon on the Mount. The apostle Matthew was identified as the author by early church, and there is little reason to doubt he penned the gospel. Matthew was a tax collector, a profession despised by his contemporaries, not only because of its corruption, but because of its collaboration with the Romans. Matthew, also known as Levi,  answered the call of Jesus to become one of his twelve disciples.

Read the Gospel of Matthew 

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2 thoughts on “Background of The Gospel of Matthew

  1. In Matthew, Jesus turns out to be the Messiah (anointed king) of a different kingdom than Jews expected. Jesus’ fulfillment of O.T. prophecies does so on a new level: his new kingdom does not transform the kingdom of Israel; his new kingdom gathers disciples from every nation, those who follow this new king from heaven. Throughout this Gospel, Jesus explains to confused disciples (including confused readers of this Gospel) the differences between him and his kingdom (of, and from, heaven) in contrast to the rulers and kingdoms of earth, beginning with the kingdom of Israel and its rulers (especially the scribes of the Pharisees).

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